Minister Mendicino announces latest steps to redesign skilled visas for talent in displacement

A family is greeted by new colleagues from Paramount Fine Foods in Toronto. The chef and his family arrived from displacement under Canada’s Economic Mobility Pathways Project.
A family is greeted by new colleagues from Paramount Fine Foods in Toronto. The chef and his family arrived from displacement under Canada’s Economic Mobility Pathways Project.

Canada is redesigning skilled immigration pathways to include talented applicants living in refugee circumstances worldwide. New steps announced today send a signal that as Canada welcomes record numbers of skilled newcomers to grow our companies and communities, this country will deliberately include the immense talent within refugee populations. 

Marco Mendicino, the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, signaled a more inclusive skilled immigration system under the federal pilot Economic Mobility Pathways Project (EMPP), which aims to improve access to Canada’s skilled visas. 

He spoke alongside Mohammed Hakmi, a fullstack developer hired by Bonfire and the first candidate to arrive under the EMPP, Lisa Smith, CEO of Glen Haven Manor, a pioneering long-term care facility that hired 15 nurses living as refugees in Kenya and Lebanon, and Khodor Ramlawi, one of those talented nurses. 

The changes announced by the Minister include:

  • Expedited processing standard for federal permanent residence pathways: This can reduce total processing timelines to somewhere closer to 8-10 months depending on the first application stage, whether through a Provincial Nominee Program, the Atlantic Immigration Pilot, the Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot, or other programs. 
  • Alternative proof of settlement funds: This can overcome one of the main financial barriers, which is the requirement to demonstrate personal savings, typically in a bank account, that can approach $20,000 for a family of three. Refugees often have little or no savings after years in displacement. Enabling the use of loans to meet this requirement would be a much-needed, sustainable solution.
  • A flexible application process: This may refer to the use of scanned documents which can overcome tech, printing, and postage barriers while enabling more efficient paperless workflows. Traditionally, some permanent residence applications have been paper-based and require original documents, signatures and photos.
  • Waiving fees for permanent residence: This can further reduce the costs of skilled immigration that fall to applicants, reducing strain on their finances before arriving in Canada and earning a first paycheque.
  • Valid passport not required: The alternative, use of a single journey travel document (SJTD), enables travel after a Canadian visa is approved without need for a valid passport. Refugees often have expired or no passports, and it can be unsafe or prohibitively expensive to renew or obtain one for immigration purposes. 

Critically, the Minister did not yet signal his intention to extend access to work permits to displaced talent. This change would revolutionize their access, by allowing them to compete far more equitably with talent from other backgrounds. 

Work permits are the single fastest and most relied-upon entry into Canada for skilled workers. But applicants to work permits must demonstrate their ability to leave Canada, effectively shutting out anyone who had to flee their home country and can’t prove strong ties to another home. If displaced talent can’t access work permits, they have to arrive on the extended timelines of permanent residence, rendering them non-competitive for many employers who need the speed and predictability available to other talent. Additionally, they’re excluded from many permanent residence pathways that require or favour applicants with in-Canada work experience.

Bottom line: Canada is building a more inclusive and equitable skilled immigration system designed to attract and retain talent, regardless of circumstance, to power teams and new home communities. This will be a major source of hope for people living displaced who have potential, and now have opportunity. 

We can’t wait to support more teams in Canada to source this incredible talent! 

Work permits can bring this progress to scale. You can learn more about the imperative of full work permit access in a Globe and Mail op-ed by Craig Damian Smith and TalentLift’s Dana Wagner, a follow-up Globe and Mail column by Doug Saunders, and a policy brief released by the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University. 

Ways to get involved: 

Policy brief on opening Canada’s skilled visas as a solution to displacement in Latin America

A chef arrives with his family in Toronto in 2019 under Canada’s Economic Mobility Pathways Project.

Displacement crises are unfolding across Latin America as people cross borders to seek safety from oppression, violence and environmental disaster. The number of Venezuelans alone who have fled their homes is approaching the scale of displacement caused by the war in Syria. They and others from across Central America are in neighbouring countries, often without work and decent living conditions, or making dangerous onward journeys. More than one million people are expected to seek safety at the American border this year. 

A significant Canadian contribution to this continent’s humanitarian emergency can be further opening skilled visas to talented applicants in displacement.

A policy brief released today co-authored by Craig Damian Smith, a senior research associate with the Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Migration and Integration program at Ryerson University, and I outline a clear and actionable set of policies to support displaced talent in Latin America. The policy brief is the first in a new series launched by the CERC in Migration and Integration

We explain how “Canada’s economic pathways could provide new routes to safety and permanence for refugees in Latin America, enabling them to fill chronic skills shortages across the economy including in lower-wage sectors.”

Recommendations include modifying the “ability to leave” requirement in temporary work permits to enable refugees to access this swift mode of entry and with it, a broader range of jobs and visa pathways; and creating additional permanent residence pathways to fill lower-wage jobs in sectors and locations facing chronic skills shortages, such as agriculture and personal support work in populous provinces. 

The recommendations would require just modest policy change and funding. By taking these steps, “Canada can show its commitment to responsibility-sharing in the region by pioneering open economic pathways to refugees, in a clear signal that the global talent pool includes millions of people displaced in the Americas.”

Further reading: 

The colour came back

Nawar Alkhaleel paints in the morning and only in sunlight when each detail she brings to life is most visible. She begins with the eyes. The face, hair and posture that form a portrait in her mind extend on the page from there. 

Her portraits are women built by colour, and their gaze, when it finds you, is difficult to break.

It took Nawar just one week to finish her first portrait after arriving in Canada in January 2020. She and her family landed in Toronto on an evening so cold that breath floats. It would be a long winter and then a pandemic ahead, but they would experience all that in Toronto, and not in Beirut, where Nawar, her spouse, Hussein, and their son had lived for years as refugees. They lived there, but it wasn’t a home. In Beirut they couldn’t work legally, or send their son to school once he grew from a toddler to a little boy, or afford much more than essentials like food – and paint.

Nawar still painted in Beirut but in fewer, quieter tones to save money on colours.

She knew she would become an artist at age 18 and enrolled in a visual arts program at a university in Homs, the city where she grew up in Syria. Her family are artists too. Her sister and brother paint, and a second brother is a machinist with a talent for Arabic calligraphy. She dreamed of a career of creating and selling her work, and began teaching art to children after university as she got started.

The war ended those plans. Homs faced heavy bombing early in the Syrian civil war and many thousands of its residents had to escape. The city counted some 1.5 million people before the war, roughly the size of Montreal, but photos after years of fighting show open-air ruins that are empty and almost look ancient.

Nawar joined Hussein in Lebanon in 2013. Their families spread out from home too, some in Turkey, others in the Emirates. Today, nearly one million people live as refugees in Lebanon, the largest host country relative to its population, where one in seven people are refugees. Exactly ten years after the start of the civil war, Syrians remain the largest displaced group globally at 6.6 million people.

There are few good options facing refugees in countries of first asylum like Lebanon. Many are forced to work illegally and face discrimination, meagre pay and exploitation. Humanitarian resettlement is nearly impossible for most people to access – less than 1% of the world’s 26 million refugees move to a safe country through resettlement each year – leaving many to turn to irregular and often dangerous journeys in pursuit of a better life.

Nawar and Hussein are part of a small but growing group globally who tried something new by using skilled immigration to leave displacement. Hussein is a talented carpenter and registered his skills and career goals with the global non-profit Talent Beyond Boundaries while living in Lebanon. Through the work of this non-profit, a pioneering employer in Vaughan, and the support of Canadian and Ontario governments and the UNHCR, Hussein interviewed for a job in Canada and got hired. He became one of the first international recruits to relocate to Canada, with Nawar and their son, as a skilled worker and former refugee under Canada’s Economic Mobility Pathways Project

Many thousands can follow as Canada’s recruitment and immigration systems shift to enable people like Hussein and Nawar to use their skills and relocate just like talented people anywhere.

Nawar’s latest painting began with the eyes and grew outwards in layers of colour. This woman’s face is shaped in blue, green, yellow, orange, red, and purple. As if her warmth and character come momentarily to the surface, only when you lock eyes together.

She left some paintings in Beirut that were too large to carry but her collection in Toronto is growing and Nawar wants to exhibit them one day. She can’t pick out a favourite, but among her favourites are women, hands like Hussein’s crafting wood, and nature, a subject she wants to better learn. This could be the place to do it.  

Her wooden easel, built by Hussein, sits in a bright living room. Without rationing paint, and in the sunlight after her son goes to school, Nawar said, “drawing here is more beautiful.”

Nawar Alkhaleel is a Toronto-based artist who specializes in oil painting and handcraft artwork. She is a graduate of the Institute of Arts in Homs, Syria. She relocated to Canada in January 2020 with her partner and young son.

Contact TalentLift to start hiring talented candidates in displacement or to reach Nawar Alkhaleel about her work. See a commissioned painting by Nawar on the cover of the Talent Beyond Boundaries cookbook